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00:30:00

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Channel 24 (225 MHz)

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mpeg2video

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TOPIC FREQUENCY

San Francisco 10, Us 8, Carmen Chu 3, Nancy Goldberg 2, Abraham Lincoln 1, Stella Lee 1, Nancy Kirshner Rodriguez 1, Emily Conroy 1, Newsom 1, Shelley Lu 1, Adriana Wen 1, San Franciscan 1, Cindy Lu 1, Cisco 1, Em 1, Ung 1, Julie 1, Erica Lam 1, Theresa Sparks 1, Stephanie Chung 1,
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  SFGTV    [untitled]  

    March 22, 2013
    3:00 - 3:30pm PDT  

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>> i love teaching. it is such an exhilarating experience when people began to feel their own creativity. >> this really is a place where all people can come and take a class and fill part of the community. this is very enriching as an artist. a lot of folks take these classes and take their digital imagery and turn it into negatives. >> there are not many black and white darkrooms available anymore. that is a really big draw. >> this is a signature piece. this is the bill largest
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darkroom in the u.s.. >> there are a lot of people that want to get into that dark room. >> i think it is the heart of this place. you feel it when you come in. >> the people who just started taking pictures, so this is really an intersection for many generations of photographers and this is a great place to learn because if you need people from different areas and also everyone who works here is working in photography.
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>> we get to build the community here. this is different. first of all, this is a great location. it is in a less-populated area. >> of lot of people come here just so that they can participate in this program. it is a great opportunity for people who have a little bit of photographic experience. the people have a lot, they can really come together and share a love and a passion. >> we offer everything from traditional black and white darkrooms to learning how to process your first roll of film. we offer classes and workshops in digital camera, digital printing.
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we offer classes basically in the shooting, ton the town at night, treasure island. there is a way for the programs exploring everyone who would like to spend the day on this program. >> hello, my name is jennifer. >> my name is simone. we are going on a field trip to take pictures up the hill. >> c'mon, c'mon, c'mon. >> actually, i have been here a lot. i have never looked closely enough to see everything. now, i get to take pictures.
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>> we want to try to get them to be more creative with it. we let them to be free with them but at the same time, we give them a little bit of direction. >> you can focus in here. >> that was cool. >> if you see that? >> behind the city, behind the houses, behind those hills. the see any more hills? >> these kids are wonderful. they get to explore, they get to see different things. >> we let them explore a little bit. they get their best.
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if their parents ever ask, we can learn -- they can say that they learned about the depth of field or the rule of thirds or that the shadows can give a good contrast. some of the things they come up with are fantastic. that is what we're trying to encourage. these kids can bring up the creativity and also the love for photography. >> a lot of people come into my classes and they don't feel like they really are creative and through the process of working and showing them and giving them some tips and ideas. >> this is kind of the best kept secret. you should come on and take a class. we have orientations on most saturdays. this is a really wonderful
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location and is the real jewel to the community. >> ready to develop your photography skills? the harvey milk photo center focuses on adult classes. and saturday workshops expose youth and adults to photography classes. >> it's so great to see a full house like this. it means the world to us and to the whole cause of anti-trafficking. we are waiting for mayor lee. my name is nancy goldberg, cochair of the seven cisco collaborative against human trafficking. i wanted to introduce my past chair, and my new cochair.
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when i tell people of my involvement their shock to hear that san francisco is in major definition of human trafficking. they think it is people from other parts of the world. there are also so many right here, from our own bay area communities. in the city that is out of human trafficking we are also committed to being an agent of change. i want to give you a brief history of sf cat, san francisco collaborative against human trafficking. in response to what we saw is a growing problem, four organizations formed up in
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2008, the jewish coalition against human trafficking; national council of jewish women, jewish reel fund, -- we then realize would needed a wider coalition in order to be more effective we reached out to a large variety of the government sectors. in february 2008 the jewish coalition held a conference against human trafficking which included agencies such as the san francisco commission on the status of women, representative of the mayor's office and other nonprofits. this event also attracted members of the state assembly and a few congressional offices. at a meeting following our conference a i was asked to
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chair the larger group and my condition was that there be a cochair from the mayor's office at that time was catherine dodd. the san francisco collaborative against human traffic was born. in 2010 - from the beginning emily morassie (sounds like) executive director of the san francisco commission on the status of women was always involved as well as theresa sparks, executive director of the human rights commission. they were not only the core of the beginning but also generously offered to help us and support us and today that is where we are housed. we have a membership of over 28 agencies public and private representing a wide area of government agencies,
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law enforcement agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human
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traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you.
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why don't we do that? why waste a moment. >> nancy did mention that we will announce the winners of the fabulous poster contest. i am the executive director of commission on the status of women. the mayor will be announcing not only the winners of the poster contest but also the winners of this year's abolitionist awards. fire commissioner -- is here and emily conroy from the department of justice is here. thank you for joining us. i want to bring up mayor lee so she can bring up the announcements of the honorees for today. apl(applause) >> thank you emily and thank
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you to the commission on the status of women to our human rights commission thank you for being here and the commissioners and staff as well. thank you police chief for being here and certainly all the other department heads. wendy thank you for being here as well. members of the community. advocacy groups that have been so important to this movement. supervisor carmen chu, i know you and mayor newsom had this initial effort back some years ago to recognize the need to abolish human trafficking. an san francisco being such an international city, many of our roots are from immigrant families. we understand the problem. we did do something about it and continue that effort. i want to thank the us
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attorney's office for being here. and so many of you who have from the community done and continue to do what you can do to end human trafficking. this is such an important challenge for all of us. and because we here at from immigrant families; we hear from immigrant women and girls. the stories are real. they come across international borders. and so san francisco being the city that is not only aware of this, and aware of international traffic that occurs we have to continue doing something about it. if anything, our goal is of course to educate our youth; to make sure they understand that they have partners in both city government and in the community to help. those that are lucky and can survive; all of this and when they end
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up on the shores of san francisco, if we can find them and provide them with support and help them change their lives. and then get to the business of the criminal acts involved in exploiting our kids. we should do all of that and this trafficking. i want to thank everybody for being here today, helping celebrate this event recognizing the awareness month but also recommitting ourselves in every possible way to do what we can do to end this on a worldwide basis and to know the source businesses and individuals and groups of people organized to continue this effort and to do our best to end their activities as well. i want to make sure that i think both emily but also nancy goldberg for your interest as
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well not only interest but your work as a native san franciscan to do everything that you have been doing to end this too. i am privileged today to recognize a number of individuals who have been strong, strong advocates, people who have gone way beyond the duty but also deserving of recognition for all their advocacy work. the first person i would like to introduce is these year's recipient of the abolitionist the word for advocacy, staff attorney with with the asian pacific legal advocacy services, 2013 abolitionist awardee for advocacy, cindy lu. apl
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(applause) we also have someone whose services have been both exemplary and deserving of recognition. she is a founder and executive director of freedom house. she is the 2013 abolitionist award for providing exemplary services, -- em. (applause) we also together in collaboration with the status of women, with supervisors, department heads, the human rights commission we wanted to make sure that future generations of children are part of the solution. in that effort both in advocacy we have a strong, strong goal of educating our public and
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all the other kids and families in our city. this is a way of our quality of life, we cannot accept human trafficking. part of the way to do that is to have this be part of the kids education, and push strongly. the collaborative this year, allow the youth of san francisco to enter in a poster contest to provide artistic ability to the messaging of this really important movement. the 2013 poster contest winners i get to announce. i will begin with third-place winners. the third-place winner, first one eighth-grade student, from james brannan middle school.
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shelley lu (sounds like) apl(applause) also an eighth-grade student from james dunham as well, stella lee. thank you. apl(applause) (applause) to be an eighth-grader. the collaborative has chosen for the second place at 12 greater, from abraham lincoln high school. stephanie chung
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(applause) and then we have a number of first place winners. i'm sure this is all about collaboration, talking about it, what it means absorbing the purpose and working together. the first place poster altogether for all of us to see. i would like to name everybody. community youth center of san francisco, the young asian women against violence youth participant jennifer chang. kimberly how.
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erica lam. allie lee. adriana wen (sounds like) diana -- and amy ung. congratulations everybody. (applause) (applause) (applause) good job everybody. thank you. and so at this time supervisor -- or do i give it back to -- nancy. thank you again.
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>> at this time we would like to call supervisor carmen chu. (applause) >> i think that is part of the program they wanted the winners to perhaps say a few words. >> thank you for choosing our picture. we were really surprised when you did. we are really happy. (applause) >> we were very surprised. thank you very much. (applause) >> i'm tiffany chung, so happy
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to be recognized in such a way. thank you very much. (applause) >> hi. i name is amy. thank you for letting us having this opportunity to make this poster and also recognize us. thank you. (applause) >> thank you. i want to thank mayor lee and the members of the collaborative. as will build awareness for human trafficking issues i would like to call attention to the need for more shelter beds according to the project study released in 2012, there are only 678 beds in the entire
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country exclusively dedicated to trafficking survivors. there are thousands the deed aftercare services. that we offer at the monarch residence for women. last year freedom house -- sorry to do this again, there are thousands that need aftercare services that we offer at the monarch services. for girls ages 12-17 years old. we must do everything we can to bring resources. (applause) thank you. and support to these brave women and children who traffic right here in our own backyard. i am grateful for this tremendo

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